What gardening jobs to do in May

Posted by Ella Dooly on

What to do in the garden in May.

With the weather continually improving, and lots of nice warm spells up and down the country it feels like the start of summer is just around the corner – and it is! But at this time of year we need to be careful of those unexpected late frosts, whose visits could leave us with a less than ideal fruit crop come later in the season.

May Tree Care May Tree Care

May has always been a special month in England with it being the time of May Day and other traditional special customs signalling the end of the harsh winter months and the beginning of the warmer summer months ahead. For our ancestors, especially in rural areas, May Day is traditionally all about looking forward optimistically to the coming (hopefully) fruitful summer months.

Now with summer approaching, but not quite on its way, we thought it would be a good idea to bring you a couple of tips on what to do in the garden this month.

With a potential increase in temperature, its good practice to ensure that newly planted trees and shrubs do not dry out. Try to stay eco conscious and water with your trees, plants and shrubs with rain or recycled water if possible rather than from a tap.

But at the same time as we experience a nice rise in temperatures, a late frost is still possible in May. To avoid any damage, prepare to cover fruit tree blossom with horticultural fleece to protect flowers if frost is forecast.

Other jobs that need doing in and around the garden

  • Weed growth will be more regular at this time of you, so ensure that you regularly hoe off weeds to make space for your trees and plants to flourish unhindered.
  • It can also start getting really hot at this time of year and if you forget to water your tree inside the conservatory or greenhouse it. Open greenhouse vents and doors on warm days
  • General garden maintenance – hedges and grass grow quicker than the colder months; mow grass weekly and make sure you check for nesting birds before clipping hedges.

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